2 years ago
Corn, Arugula & Tomato Salad

From Eating Well.

Corn, Arugula & Tomato Salad

From EatingWellSummer 2004

Fresh corn and tomatoes make an especially attractive and delicious summer salad. Sweet corn balances the peppery arugula and tart tomatoes.

READER’S COMMENT:

"Great salad! But too much oil (much more than necessary). I used 2 tablespoons and next time will use only 1. "

Corn, Arugula & Tomato Salad Recipe

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons minced shallots
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 6 cups loosely packed arugula, (about 6 ounces)
  • 2 cups corn kernels, (about 4 ears)
  • 1 1/2 pints cherry tomatoes, halved

Preparation

  1. Combine vinegar and shallots in a large bowl and let stand at room temperature for 10 minutes.
  2. Whisk oil into the vinegar mixture until blended. Season with salt and pepper. Add arugula and toss to coat. Arrange the arugula on serving plates. Add corn and tomatoes to the bowl, toss to coat with the dressing that remains, then spoon the mixture over the arugula and serve.
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2 years ago
Gravenstein apples — get them before they’re gone

From the Sacramento News & Review.

Gravenstein: A small grenade of apple flavor, ready to explode in your mouth.

Apples might as well be seasonless. Though most varieties ripen in the fall, they are available virtually anywhere, anytime. Apples last for months in cold storage, taste as good as new even in June, and may be the world’s most ubiquitous fruit.

But not the Gravenstein. An early-ripening variety, Gravensteins are only available for several weeks in midsummer, are only grown in Sonoma County and have virtually no commercial shelf life. In effect, the Gravensteins come and then are gone, almost all eaten locally. Now is the time to get them. Area markets carry them only sporadically. Keep your eyes peeled.

The orchards are centered around Sebastopol, west of Santa Rosa, where farmer Paul Kolling grows some 75 acres of Gravensteins under the business name Nana Mae’s Organics. Though nearly every other crop in California has been delayed almost a month by cool weather, not the Gravensteins. According to Kolling, that’s because the orchards are mostly dry-farmed. He says that denying the trees the pleasure of irrigated water stresses them, essentially inducing a state of botanical panic that spurs fast ripening of the fruits.

Dry-farming also produces smaller apples denser in flavor. Processing further condenses flavor, and Kolling, for one, sends 95 percent of his crop to a local processing house to be rendered into applesauce, juice and cider vinegar. These products are sold in jars bearing the Nana Mae’s label and can be found at the Davis Food Co-op. If you never find a fresh Gravenstein this year, don’t fret; some say that jarred sauce is the best way to taste them—essentially a condensed Gravenstein flavor bomb.

Kolling has also considered finding a place at one of the local farmers markets later this year, when Nana Mae’s Jonathan, Rhode Island greening, and Kolling golden apples—the latter of which originated as a seedling on his property 15 years ago—will be in season. By then, though, the fresh Gravensteins will be gone.

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3 years ago
Black Peppered Nectarines

Three pounds of nectarines in the CSA box this week! Two were bruised and starting to go bad from that point, so I came up with this simple treatment. I put it in the dehydrator overnight and had it for breakfast, but you could do the dehydrator during the day and have it for dessert instead.

A Raw Right Now original.

Black Peppered Nectarines

Dice two to three nectarines and place in a bowl. Add the juice of half a lemon and a tablespoon or so of honey or your preferred sweetener — if your nectarines are ripe and sweet, you’ll need less; if they’re not so sweet, you’ll need more. Adjust to your taste. Add 1/4 teaspoon of vanilla, several generous grinds of black pepper and a small pinch of salt. Stir to mix, then pour into a dish that will fit into your dehydrator. Cover with plastic wrap and dehydrate at 118 for four to six hours, or until quite juicy. Stir in a tablespoon of Mila or ground chia and return to the dehydrator for another hour to allow the juices to thicken up.

Would be good over a raw tart crust or topped with crunchy soaked-and-dried buckwheat. I just ate it with a spoon.

I also did a variation with Dapple pluots and a combination of Chinese five-spice powder (old, been kicking around the spice cabinet far too long) and cinnamon. Tasty. Gotta get new five-spice, though.

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3 years ago

Whether  you call them chickpeas or garbanzos, most of us think of them as those  crinkly yellow pea-size dried beans found in health-food store bins, or  canned. Actually, the garbanzo doesn’t start life as a shriveled, hard,  yellow legume, but as a perky little ball, ranging in color from the  palest green to a color that resembles the flesh of an avocado. It’s  cocooned in a papery shell, two or three beans to the pod, and is one of  the easiest beans to shell.
Admittedly, you aren’t likely to find  fresh garbanzos next to the green beans and carrots at your  neighborhood chain supermarket, but in the last few years,  California-grown chickpeas have started to pop up from roughly early May  to September at farmers’ markets and in specialty produce stores.… Since the shells are very light,  there is very little waste by weight, so while they may be a specialty  item, fresh chickpeas are certainly not in the luxury category.
Food  historians — Colin Spencer, James Peterson, et al — tell us that  wild-growing chickpeas have been documented in the Fertile Crescent,  cradle of so many of our grains and legumes, as long as 7,000 years ago.  They were widely cultivated in the Middle East and by the Egyptians,  Greeks and Romans in classical times.…
Farm-fresh garbanzos are so tender that they  can be added raw to salads for an appealing crunch, says Elisabeth  Schwarz, executive chef at the Restaurant at Wente Vineyards in  Livermore. The German-born chef is passionately devoted to the fresh and  local credo and puts chickpea dishes on her menu this time of year.…
However, her devotion to the  chickpea may not be quite as ardent as that of ancient Romans, who  actually named some important folks after the humble little bean. Its  name in classical Rome? Cicero.

Whether you call them chickpeas or garbanzos, most of us think of them as those crinkly yellow pea-size dried beans found in health-food store bins, or canned. Actually, the garbanzo doesn’t start life as a shriveled, hard, yellow legume, but as a perky little ball, ranging in color from the palest green to a color that resembles the flesh of an avocado. It’s cocooned in a papery shell, two or three beans to the pod, and is one of the easiest beans to shell.

Admittedly, you aren’t likely to find fresh garbanzos next to the green beans and carrots at your neighborhood chain supermarket, but in the last few years, California-grown chickpeas have started to pop up from roughly early May to September at farmers’ markets and in specialty produce stores.… Since the shells are very light, there is very little waste by weight, so while they may be a specialty item, fresh chickpeas are certainly not in the luxury category.

Food historians — Colin Spencer, James Peterson, et al — tell us that wild-growing chickpeas have been documented in the Fertile Crescent, cradle of so many of our grains and legumes, as long as 7,000 years ago. They were widely cultivated in the Middle East and by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans in classical times.…

Farm-fresh garbanzos are so tender that they can be added raw to salads for an appealing crunch, says Elisabeth Schwarz, executive chef at the Restaurant at Wente Vineyards in Livermore. The German-born chef is passionately devoted to the fresh and local credo and puts chickpea dishes on her menu this time of year.…

However, her devotion to the chickpea may not be quite as ardent as that of ancient Romans, who actually named some important folks after the humble little bean. Its name in classical Rome? Cicero.

Cite Arrow via alittlecooked
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3 years ago
What’s in Season in the Bay Area: June

From the Chart of Bay Area Seasonal Specialties.

Items newly in season this month are marked in bold; items in their last month are marked in italics; items available year-round are marked with an asterisk (*).

  • apricots
  • artichokes
  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • avocados
  • basil
  • beets*
  • blackberries
  • blueberries
  • bok choy*
  • broccoli*
  • cabbage*
  • carrots*
  • cauliflower*
  • celery
  • chard*
  • cherries
  • collards*
  • corn
  • cucumber
  • eggplant
  • figs
  • garlic*
  • kale*
  • leeks*
  • lettuces*
  • melons
  • mushrooms*
  • nectarines
  • onions*
  • peaches
  • peas
  • plums
  • radishes*
  • raspberries
  • spinach*
  • strawberries
  • squash, summer
  • tomatoes

The calendar says it’s June, but the weather sure doesn’t. *sigh*

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3 years ago
Meal planning: what’s supposed to be in the CSA box this week

What’s expected in this week’s CSA box, assuming they don’t run out of something and have to substitute.

Monday 04/11/2011 - Friday 04/15/2011

Service: Valley Box

(Weights are approximate)

turnip_tokyo.jpg 1 bu Our Farm White Baby Turnip

kale_green.jpg 1 bu Our Farm Green Kale

collardgreens.jpg 1 bu Our Farm Bunched Collard

potato_red.jpg 1 lb Our Farm Assorted Potato

bokchoy_baby.jpg 1 cnt Our Farm Baby Bok Choy

spearmint.jpg 1 bu Our Farm Fresh Mint

garlic_green.jpg 1 bu Capay Green Garlic

asparagus_green.jpg .75 lb Esparto Green Asparagus

mushroom_kingtrumpet.jpg .5 lb Sonoma King Trumpet Mushroom

kiwi_green.jpg .5 lb Marysville Fresh Kiwi

Comments

 

3 years ago
What’s in season in the Bay Area: April

From the Chart of Bay Area Seasonal Specialties.

Items newly in season this month are marked in bold; items in their last month are marked in italics; items available year-round are marked with an asterisk (*).

  • artichokes
  • arugula
  • asparagus
  • avocados
  • beets*
  • bok choy*
  • broccoli*
  • cabbage*
  • carrots*
  • cauliflower*
  • celery
  • chard*
  • collards*
  • garlic*
  • grapefruit
  • kale*
  • leeks*
  • lemons
  • lettuce*
  • mushrooms*
  • onions*
  • oranges
  • peas
  • potatoes
  • radishes*
  • spinach*
  • strawberries

Gone since last month: apples (the only ones at the market on Saturday were Fujis and Pink Ladies, and clearly not at the peak-of-season prime quality) and brussels sprouts.

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3 years ago
Meal planning: what’s supposed to be in the CSA box this week

What’s predicted for Friday’s produce box, assuming they don’t run out of something and substitute something else.

Signs of spring!

Monday 03/28/2011 - Friday 04/01/2011

Service: Valley Box

(Weights are approximate)

potato_germanbutterball.jpg2 lb Our Farm Potato German Butterball

kiwi_green.jpg1 lb Marysville Kiwi Fresh

chard_red.jpg1 cnt Our Farm Chard Red

collardgreens.jpg1 bu Our Farm Collard Bunched

radish_rfrenchbreakfast.jpg1 cnt Our Farm Radish Red

carrot_nates.jpg1 bu Capay Carrot Nantes

garlic_green.jpg1 cnt Capay Garlic Green

mushroom_shitake.jpg.5 lb Sonoma Mushroom Mixed

(Source: info3.farmfreshtoyou.com)

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3 years ago
Meal planning: What’s supposed to be in the CSA box this week

What we’re expecting in Friday’s produce box, assuming they don’t run out of something and substitute something else.

Monday 03/14/2011 - Friday 03/18/2011

Service: Valley Box

(Weights are approximate)

fennel.jpg 1 cnt Our Farm Fennel Bulb

cabbage_savoy.jpg 1 cnt Our Farm Cabbage Savoy

kale_dino.jpg 1 bu Our Farm Kale Lacinato / Dino

collardgreens.jpg 1 bu Our Farm Collard Bunched

chard_red.jpg 1 bu Our Farm Chard Red

leeks_bunched.jpg 1 lb Capay Leeks Loose

spinach.jpg 1 bu Capay Spinach Bunched

carrot_nates.jpg 1 bu Capay Carrot Nantes

Yep, still winter.

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3 years ago
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