2 years ago
Orange-Miso Sauce

From Eating Well.

Orange-Miso Sauce

From EatingWellSummer 2004, The EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook (2005)

Mild, nutty flaxseed oil, the richest plant source of omega-3 fatty acids, provides the perfect base for salty miso and sweet orange juice. This sauce is delightful over grilled eggplant, fish and chicken or used as a salad dressing.

Orange-Miso Sauce Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup sweet white miso, (see Ingredient notes)
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 1/4 cup flaxseed oil, (see Ingredient notes) or canola oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon mirin, (optional)

Preparation

  1. Combine miso, orange zest and juice, oil, ginger, rice vinegar and mirin (if using) in a small bowl and whisk until thoroughly blended.

Tips & Notes

  • Ingredient Notes: Made from fermented soybeans, miso is a common ingredient in Japanese cooking. There are different types of miso, in shades ranging from white and yellow to reddish brown and dark brown. Available at health-food stores and Japanese markets.
  • Flaxseed oil, pressed from flaxseeds, is a valued as a source of omega-3 fatty acids. It is highly perishable, so store in the refrigerator and use as soon as possible. Available at natural-foods stores.
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2 years ago
Carrot-Sesame Dressing

Using a high-speed blender would probably result in the smoothest possible dressing. Use your favorite mild-flavored oil if (like me) the idea of otherwise-unspecified “vegetable oil” makes you a bit leery. From a post on Ask MetaFilter.

Carrot Sesame Dressing

½ cup white miso
6 tablespoons vegetable oil
¼ cup packed finely grated peeled carrot
2 tablespoons finely grated peeled ginger
2 tablespoons unseasoned rice vinegar
4 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds
2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil
2 teaspoons honey

Mix everything together in a jar. Seal tightly and shake hard. Use it in a day or two, it doesn’t last long in the fridge.
posted by Splunge at 9:56 AM on March 26

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3 years ago
"Liquid Ohm" Juice Punch

Make sun tea or refrigerator tea if you don’t want to use hot water on the chamomile. From Cooking Light.

Ingredients
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • chamomile tea bag
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated peeled fresh ginger
  • peeled ripe mangoes, chopped
  • carrots, chopped
  • ripe pear, peeled and cored
  • 2 cups fresh orange juice
Preparation
  • Pour 1 cup boiling water over tea bag in a small bowl, and steep for 10 minutes. Remove and discard tea bag.
  • Combine brewed tea, ginger, mangoes, carrots, and pear in a blender; process until smooth. Stir in orange juice. Cover and chill 8 hours or overnight. Strain mixture through a cheesecloth-lined sieve into a medium bowl, pressing solids with a wooden spoon or a rubber spatula to squeeze out juice; discard solids. Pour into a pitcher.

(Source: myrecipes.com)

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3 years ago
Light Ginger-Citrus Napa Cabbage Slaw

Originally from Happy. Healthy. Life. Via veganfeast.

This isn’t your grandma’s cabbage slaw. One of my favorite uses for Napa Cabbage is to chop it up into a raw vegan slaw. Light flavors of ginger and citrus give this dense tender cabbage variety a bright zesty flavor. Instead of going heavy on dark soy sauce or a heavy helping of vegan cream, this slaw recipe stays light and palate cleansing. It makes a perfect side dish for a sunny day meal…

Light Ginger Citrus Napa Slaw

vegan, serves 4

3-4 cups Napa Cabbage, chopped into thin 2 inch strips
1 small yellow bell pepper, diced
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
2 tsp olive oil
2 tsp black pepper
1/2 cup orange slices or mandarin segments
1 Tbsp lemon juice
3 Tbsp Vegenaise
1-2 Tbsp fresh ginger, grated
2 tsp agave syrup
1 tsp paprika
dash of salt as needed
optional add-in: 1/2 cup chopped flat parsley

Directions:
Add cabbage, bell pepper and citrus slices to large bowl.
Add vinegar, oil, vegenaise and agave syrup.
Toss well.
Add in salt, pepper, ginger, paprika and lemon juice.
Toss well again.
Chill until ready to serve.
A few hours in the fridge will assist in marinating the cabbage.
*for a creamier slaw simply add more vegenaise.

Serve as a side dish or salad.

More optional add in ideas:
cayenne, garlic, sliced almonds, pea shoots, sliced fennel, cold snow peas, bean sprouts, toasted sesame seeds.

napa_cabbage_slaw

Cite Arrow via veganfeast
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3 years ago
Spicy Thai Salad Dressing

From Choosing Raw.

I ordered the Thai avocado salad (“a mixture of avocado, tomatoes, cucumbers, nori pieces, and carrots served over fresh onganic seasonal greens tossed in Thai spicy citrus dressing“). Of course, I forgot to take a photo (oops!). But fear not: I liked it so much that I decided to re-interpret it tonight.

The meal began with dressing. I played around and came up with the following, and it was absolutely delicious! Sweet, spicy, and infused with basil and cilantro, this dressing is thick enough to serve as a vegetable dip, and rich enough for a dinner salad. Best of all, it’s full of healthy fats and vitamin E.

Spicy Thai Dressing (yields almost two cups)

Ingredients:

1 Avocado
1 cup water
¼ cup cilantro
¼ cup basil
¼ tsp salt (or more)
2 dates, or 1 packet stevia
Sprinkle of cayenne pepper (I must have used 1/8 tsp) and 3/4 inch ginger for heat

Blend all ingredients on high and adjust seasoning to taste. Here’s what you get:

dressing

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3 years ago
Asian Dressing

From Choosing Raw.

Asian Dressing (Makes 1 1/2 cup)

Ingredients:

1 inch ginger
1 cup olive oil (or flax oil)
2 tsp sesame oil (toasted)
Juice of 1 lime
4 tbsp mellow white miso
6 dates, pitted, or ¼ cup maple syrup
2 tbsp nama shoyu
1/3 cup water

Blend all ingredients on high till creamy and emulsified.

(Source: choosingraw.com)

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Raw Spicy Coconut Noodles

I’m not sure what she means by “ground chili pepper”. In my cooking vocabulary, there are chile peppers, which come in a variety of levels of spiciness and are available both fresh and dried, and there’s chili powder, which is a blend of ground chiles and spices. My best guess for “ground chili pepper” is cayenne. (Here endeth the detail-freak digression for the evening. *grin*)

On a more serious note, you may wish to avoid papaya if you’re concerned about GMOs and contamination.

From a post on Raw Freedom Community.

Spicy Peanut Coconut Noodle
By Sarma Melngailis
Posted on GreenChefs here [RRN note: link seems to be broken/domain has been nabbed by a squatter]

Peanuts are technically a legume, although you wouldn’t necessarily think so considering someone misleadingly named them “peanuts.” Make sure you get really fresh, organically grown peanuts. Some debate persists about peanuts having toxicity, but it seems this may be from peanuts that are too old; at any rate, most toxins and other undesirables are washed away in the soaking process. However, if you don’t feel comfortable eating peanuts, try this with cashews.

“One of our chefs, Amanda, helped us turn this idea into a really great, flavorful dish. The flesh of young Thai coconuts makes perfect noodles — although they are soft, they do not stick together and are as easy or easier to eat then regular starchy noodles.”

Serves 4

For the spiced peanuts:
1 1/2 cups raw peanuts, coarsely chopped and soaked 4 hours or more
1/4 cup raw honey
2 teaspoons ground chili pepper
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Drain and dry the peanuts and toss them in a medium bowl with the honey, chili pepper, and salt until well coated. Spread them in one layer on a Teflex-lined dehydrator tray and dehydrate at 115F for 1 to 2 days, until crunchy.


For the peanut sauce:
1/2 cup coconut meat
1 cup coconut water
2 cups peanuts, soaked 4 hours or more
1/4 cup nama shoyu
1 cup chopped ginger
1/2 cup galangal
3/4 cup raw almond butter
2 small red chili peppers, seeds optional
1/2 to 1 cup filtered water
3 tablespoons maple syrup
1/2 cup lime juice

In a high-speed blender, blend all the sauce ingredients except the lime juice until smooth. If using right away, add the lime juice and blend further to combine. If not, store the sauce in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Before serving, bring to room temperature and thoroughly stir or blend in the lime juice to thin it out again.


For serving:
2 cups coconut noodles, from about 4 coconuts
1 cup julienned jicama
1 cup julienned green papaya (or green mango)
1 cup julienned bok choy
1 cup julienned French radishes
2 green onions, white and 1 inch green, thinly sliced on a bias
1 large handful cilantro
1 small handful Thai basil
1 tablespoon finely minced red chili pepper
Coarse sea salt
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 tablespoons nama shoyu
2 limes, cut in half

In a large bowl, add the coconut noodles, jicama, green papaya, and the peanut sauce and toss to coat well. Add the bok choy, radishes, green onions, cilantro, half of the basil, half of the red chile, a sprinkle of salt, and gently toss. Divide among 3 serving plates and sprinkle with the spiced peanuts and the remaining basil and chili. Drizzle the sesame oil and nama shoyu on the plate around the noodles and garnish with the lime halves (which should be squeezed over the noodles just before eating).

 

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3 years ago
Kelp Noodles with Almond Butter Sauce

From the Raw Freedom Community.

Serves 6 as a side dish- 4 as a main

16-oz pkg Sea Tangle Kelp Noodles
2 tbsp peeled, grated ginger
1 C carrots-grated
1/2 C coconut water
1 C each red and green cabbage shredded
1 tbsp sesame oil
2 C (about) shredded baby bok choy
2 tbsp lemon or lime juice
¼ C shredded daikon radish, or regular red radish
1½ tsp Celtic sea salt
6 tbsp almond butter*
½ tsp cayenne pepper, optional

Wash, shred, and grate all vegetables and place them in a bowl with the Kelp Noodles (these noodles are ready to use, ready to eat – just open the package and put in bowl!)

Blend almond butter, ginger, coconut water, sesame oil, lemon juice, sea salt, and cayenne, if you’re going spicy! Blend well. Pour dressing over your vegetables and noodles, toss, and let salad sit to marinate for 30 minutes.

* Almond butter can be substituted for other nut butters.

(Source: rawfreedomcommunity.info)

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Raw Sesame Noodles

From Gone Raw.

This recipe is adapted from a cooked version of Sesame Noodles that I used to enjoy frequently. I used to serve as a chilled dish in the summer but this version can be dehydrated to warm it up for the wintertime too. Its pretty quick to whip together for a quick dinner, just my style :-)

Ingredients: 

½ cup tahini/sesame paste
.125 cup shoyu/tamari
.33 cup water
2 tablespoon fresh ginger or 3/4 TBSP powered, pressed or minced
1 clove garlic
2 tablespoon ume vinegar or apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoon agave nectar or honey
½ teaspoon red pepper flakes or pinch of cayenne powder, (optional)
4 scallions, sliced thin
1 teaspoon sesame seeds
1 winter squash or zucchini (for noodles)

Preparation: 

Make noodles with the winter squash, zucchini or other hard vegetable using a saladacco or spirooli. Mix the rest of the ingredients in a bowl except the sesame seeds and a few of the scallion slices. Mix noodles with the sauce. Place on a serving plate and garnish with sesame seeds and the scallion slices that you set aside. Eat right away or dehydrate 30-60 minutes (enough to warm it up).

(Source: goneraw.com)

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3 years ago
Unfried Unrice

Texture is important with dishes like this —you don’t want to overprocess the cauliflower or the final dish will have a wet, mushy mouthfeel. It’s best to stop when you think it’s still a little underprocessed and taste it. You can always process it more, but there’s no way to undo it if you’ve gone too far.

From Gone Raw.

Servings:  Makes 6+ cups

This rice is as close as you’ll come to real fried rice. It’s got the right balance of mouth feel and taste, and it was a winner here at the house, even with Mr. Picky. You’ll find this serves 3 VERY generously, or four, with a side dish. Feel free to serve it very cold as a salad, or slightly warm, as I’ve suggested, for an authentic Fried Rice.

Ingredients: 

1 Head of Cauliflower
1 ten ounce package peas, thawed, or fresh peas
2 tablespoon onion
2 clove garlic
¼ cup cilantro or flat leafed parsley
1 inch of lemongrass
3 tablespoon olive oil
a drizzle of sesame oil, optional
2 teaspoon ginger, grated
nama shoyu, Braggs, or gf tamari
1 cup hulled sunflower seeds

Preparation: 

In the bowl of your food processor, pulse cauliflower into ‘rice’ and place in a bowl.

In the FP, pulse the onion, garlic, lemongrass, and cilantro or parsley until finely minced. Place in bowl.

Place peas in bowl. Stir all ingredients together.

Drizzle with oils and nama shoyu. Stir in sunflower seeds.

Heat on very low heat ina saucepan, stirring contstantly until just warm to the touch, or place in dehydrator for 30 minutes.

(Source: goneraw.com)

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