3 years ago
Green Apple and Celery Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette

Skip toasting the walnuts, of course. From Cooking Light.

Green Apple and Celery Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette

This crunchy salad can chill for up to an hour before serving. If you want to get a head start on the preparation, slice the celery, chop the parsley, and toast the nuts in advance.

  • YIELD: 8 servings (serving size: 1 cup)
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons extravirgin olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 6 cups sliced peeled Granny Smith apple (about 3 apples)
  • 4 cups thinly sliced celery (about 6 stalks)
  • 1/4 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 3 tablespoons coarsely chopped walnuts, toasted
Preparation

Combine first 7 ingredients in a large bowl, stirring well with a whisk. Add the apple and remaining ingredients, and toss well to combine.

(Source: myrecipes.com)

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3 years ago
Watermelon, Fennel, and Parsley Salad

From Cooking Light.

Ingredients
5 cups cubed seeded watermelon, divided
1 Tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
4 cups thinly sliced fennel bulb (about 2 medium)
1 1/2 cups fresh flat leaf parsley

Directions

Place 1 cup melon in blender; process until smooth. Strain mixture through a fine sieve over a bowl, reserving 1/4 cup juice. Discard solids and remaining juice. [NOTE: What? Discard? No! Drink the juice!]

Combine 1/4 cup watermelon juice, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a large bowl, stirring well. Add remaining watermelon, fennel, and parsley; toss gently to combine.

(Source: epicurious.com)

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3 years ago
Black Peppered Nectarines

Three pounds of nectarines in the CSA box this week! Two were bruised and starting to go bad from that point, so I came up with this simple treatment. I put it in the dehydrator overnight and had it for breakfast, but you could do the dehydrator during the day and have it for dessert instead.

A Raw Right Now original.

Black Peppered Nectarines

Dice two to three nectarines and place in a bowl. Add the juice of half a lemon and a tablespoon or so of honey or your preferred sweetener — if your nectarines are ripe and sweet, you’ll need less; if they’re not so sweet, you’ll need more. Adjust to your taste. Add 1/4 teaspoon of vanilla, several generous grinds of black pepper and a small pinch of salt. Stir to mix, then pour into a dish that will fit into your dehydrator. Cover with plastic wrap and dehydrate at 118 for four to six hours, or until quite juicy. Stir in a tablespoon of Mila or ground chia and return to the dehydrator for another hour to allow the juices to thicken up.

Would be good over a raw tart crust or topped with crunchy soaked-and-dried buckwheat. I just ate it with a spoon.

I also did a variation with Dapple pluots and a combination of Chinese five-spice powder (old, been kicking around the spice cabinet far too long) and cinnamon. Tasty. Gotta get new five-spice, though.

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3 years ago
Moroccan Carrot Salad (Schlata Chizo)

From Epicurious.

Carrot salads are a relatively new dish, especially raw ones. Until well into the twentieth century, most Europeans ate only cooked carrots, primarily in stews and soups. In the Middle East, people also used them as a component of cooked dishes, but sometimes added grated or minced raw carrots as a minor ingredient to various salads. It was in northwestern Africa that carrots, both cooked and raw, became the featured component of salads — typically an accompaniment to couscous or part of an assortment of salads.

Moroccans brought carrot salads to Israel in the 1940s, and they quickly became ubiquitous. These salads are a traditional Rosh Hashanah dish in Israel, a symbol of a sweet and fruitful year to come. At many Israeli restaurants, cooked carrot salad automatically appears on the table with the bread, pickles, and hummus. The carrots are usually flavored with charmoula, a characteristic Moroccan marinade of oil, lemon juice, garlic, cumin, and salt. Most cooks add heat with chilies, sometimes in dangerous proportions. I have tasted some that left me gasping and other that proved a lively appetizer, so adjust the amount of chilies to your own preference and that of your guests. For fancy presentation, Israelis serve raw carrot salad, commonly called gezer chai (“live carrots”), in quartered avocados or on a bed of lettuce leaves, garnished with a sprig of mint.

Yield: Makes 5 to 6 servings

Ingredients

1 pound carrots, coarsely grated (about 4 cups)
1/4 cup vegetable oil or extra-virgin olive oil
3 to 4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley
2 to 4 cloves garlic, mashed or minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin or 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin and 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
Pinch of salt
About 1/2 teaspoon harissa (Northwest African chili paste), or 1 tablespoon minced green chilies, or 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cayenne (optional)

Preparation

In a large bowl, mix together all the ingredients. Cover and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours or up to 2 days to allow the flavors to meld and permeate the carrots. Served chilled or at room temperature.

(Source: epicurious.com)

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3 years ago
Strawberry Chia Fluff

Canned coconut milk is not raw, but it’s possible to make your own.

From Diet, Dessert and Dogs.

A little taste of impending spring, this is a variation on the classic chia pudding, or a much fruitier, lighter version of Crimson Mousse I made with strawberries from our organic produce delivery last week.  (But calling it “Fluff” makes it sound much more appealing, doesn’t it?)  ;)   Feel free to use another berry if you prefer.

Strawberry Chia Fluff for Spring

The coconut milk adds richness and creaminess, yet this still tastes like a light dessert, and one that is both cool and refreshing because of the strawberries.  One spoonful and you’ll know that warmer weather is on the way.

2/3 cup (160 ml) full-fat coconut milk (the kind in the can)
2 cups (480 ml) sliced fresh or frozen strawberries
2 Tbsp (30 ml) whole chia seeds*
1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) pure almond extract (omit if sensitive)
1 tsp (5 ml) pure vanilla extract
1 Tbsp (15 ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice
15-25 drops plain or vanilla stevia, to taste

Place all ingredients in a high-powered blender* (such as a VitaMix) and blend until perfectly smooth.  Pour into glasses and refrigerate until cold, 1-2 hours (or just eat it right away if you can’t wait–thinner, but still good).

*NOTE: If you don’t have a high-powered blender, you can still make this, but grind the chia seeds first in a coffee grinder until they form a fine powder; pour the powder into the blender along with the other ingredients.

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Classic Raw Zucchini Hummus

From Choosing Raw.

Classic Raw Hummus (Raw, vegan, gluten and soy free)

Yields 1 3/4 cups

2 heaping cups (about 2 small zucchini) chopped
1 clove garlic, minced (optional)
1 tsp cumin
2 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup hulled sesame seeds

1) Place ingredients in a high speed blender (like a Vitamix) set to manual speed, with zucchini at the bottom. Begin blending at low speed, using the plunger to help get everything going. As the mixture blends, you can turn the speed up, until eventually the whole mixture is blending smoothly.

2) Switch speed to high, and let the mix get very creamy. Taste; adjust seasonings, and re-blend. Serve.

Food processor option:

2 heaping cups (about 2 small zucchini) chopped
1 clove garlic, minced (optional)
1 tsp cumin
2 tbsp lemon juice
3/4 cup tahini

1) Instead of chopping zucchini, shred it using the processor’s shredder attachment. Turn shredded zucchini into a bowl, and use paper towel or a clean dish cloth to squeeze out as much of the natural moisture as you can.

2) Return zucchini to processor and add remaining ingredients. Process till smooth.

The food processor option will yield thinner hummus, but it will still taste great; this is how I made raw hummus for over a year before I got my Vita-Mix!

(Source: choosingraw.com)

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3 years ago
Light Ginger-Citrus Napa Cabbage Slaw

Originally from Happy. Healthy. Life. Via veganfeast.

This isn’t your grandma’s cabbage slaw. One of my favorite uses for Napa Cabbage is to chop it up into a raw vegan slaw. Light flavors of ginger and citrus give this dense tender cabbage variety a bright zesty flavor. Instead of going heavy on dark soy sauce or a heavy helping of vegan cream, this slaw recipe stays light and palate cleansing. It makes a perfect side dish for a sunny day meal…

Light Ginger Citrus Napa Slaw

vegan, serves 4

3-4 cups Napa Cabbage, chopped into thin 2 inch strips
1 small yellow bell pepper, diced
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
2 tsp olive oil
2 tsp black pepper
1/2 cup orange slices or mandarin segments
1 Tbsp lemon juice
3 Tbsp Vegenaise
1-2 Tbsp fresh ginger, grated
2 tsp agave syrup
1 tsp paprika
dash of salt as needed
optional add-in: 1/2 cup chopped flat parsley

Directions:
Add cabbage, bell pepper and citrus slices to large bowl.
Add vinegar, oil, vegenaise and agave syrup.
Toss well.
Add in salt, pepper, ginger, paprika and lemon juice.
Toss well again.
Chill until ready to serve.
A few hours in the fridge will assist in marinating the cabbage.
*for a creamier slaw simply add more vegenaise.

Serve as a side dish or salad.

More optional add in ideas:
cayenne, garlic, sliced almonds, pea shoots, sliced fennel, cold snow peas, bean sprouts, toasted sesame seeds.

napa_cabbage_slaw

Cite Arrow via veganfeast
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Sesame–Mixed Vegetable “Noodles” with Herbs

I find myself amused by the title “Executive Sous Chef”. Sounds like professional kitchens these days need org charts.

By Sarma Melngailis, via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Sesame–Mixed Vegetable “Noodles” with Herbs
Serves 8 to 10
One night, our executive sous chef Anthony made an amuse-bouche out of a little bundle of thinly sliced vegetables tossed in a dressing and tied together with a chive. The flavor reminded me of creamy peanut butter noodles. It’s now a regular in our family meal rotation, and so yummy!
Mellow red miso has a deep, semisweet flavor, but you can use another variety of miso if you prefer. Most sliceable vegetables taste great with this dressing, so it’s really a matter of what looks good at the market or in your garden, what’s in season, or what you happen to have on hand. Substitute or add julienned yellow summer squash, jicama, cucumber, thinly sliced snow peas, or napa cabbage. If you like seaweed, add soaked, rinsed, and drained arame or hijiki. For sweetness add thinly sliced mango, or for richness sliced avocado. Basil or mint chiffonade, or both, are also nice additions.
In fact, you can prepare this with almost anything. If all you have is a pile of zucchini and nothing else, that would be just fine, too. Multiply the dressing recipe to keep on hand as a salad dressing or dipping sauce.


Sesame Dressing
1cup sesame tahini
¼ cup sesame oil
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
¼ cup mellow red miso
3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons filtered water
1/4 cup black sesame seeds

In a large bowl, whisk together the tahini, sesame oil, lemon juice, miso, and 1/2 cup of the water. Add the remaining water a bit at a time and continue whisking until smooth.
Stir in the sesame seeds and set aside.

Vegetables
4 cups daikon radish, julienned on a mandoline
2 red bell peppers, cored and julienned
3 medium zucchini, julienned on a mandoline
3 medium carrots, peeled and julienned on a mandoline
6 baby bok choy, leaves thinly sliced on a bias
3 scallions, whites and about 1 inch of green, thinly sliced
1 big handful cilantro leaves
Sea salt

In a large bowl, toss all the prepared vegetables and the sesame dressing until evenly coated.
Season to taste with sea salt.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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Herb and Argan Salad

Argan oil is expensive but awfully tasty. Worth experimenting with other nut oils to see if you can find one less pricey that still works well.

By Sarma Melngailis via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Herb and Argan Salad
Serves 4 to 6

Before Neal became our chef, he worked on the line. Late one night, I asked him to make me a salad, telling him only that I wanted it to be light, with plenty of herbs. As it turns out, what came out from the kitchen was the most delicious salad I had ever eaten. There was something about the balance of flavors, the lightness of the dressing, and the perfect tart-citrus acidity, with just the right seasoning. Oh, and yes, tons of herbs. Also, either he knew of my love of fennel and capers, or we just share that fondness, but those made it into the salad, too. Capers have a briny saltiness with a bit of a mustard taste, and fennel adds a uniquely aromatic anise flavor. The nuts give the salad some crunch, and the avocado some creaminess, but I tasted another nutty flavor that turned out to be argan oil. Like macadamia oil, this oil is so flavorful that a little goes a long way.

1 large bowl of mixed baby lettuces
1 very large handful parsley leaves
1 small handful mint leaves
1 small handful purple basil leaves
1/2 fennel bulb, cored and shaved thin on a mandoline or using a sharp knife
1 large handful grape or teardrop tomatoes, sliced into halves
3 tablespoons capers
2 tablespoons argan oil, or other nut oil
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 small handful raw pistachio nuts, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil or nut oil
1/2 ripe avocado, thinly sliced

Place the greens, herbs, fennel, tomatoes, and capers in a bowl and toss with the argan oil and lemon juice, adjusting quantities to taste. Season lightly with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place the pistachio nuts in a small bowl, add the olive oil and a pinch of salt, and toss well to coat.
Divide the salad among serving plates, sprinkle with the chopped pistachio mixture, and top with sliced avocado.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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Vegan Caesar Salad

From Choosing Raw. She suggests sprinkling the finished salad with nutritional yeast; I’d recommend something like Parma! instead as being a bit closer to Parmesan.

There was a time not so long ago when I assumed that I Caesar salad and I would never meet again. I was a new vegan, and I didn’t know all of the inns and outs, but I did know that eggs and parmesan were not on the menu. Besides that, my memories of Caesar salad were mostly limited to my own sadness that anyone would smother crisp, fresh romaine in heaps of dressing that was often no better than mayo. Little did I know then that there are a million recipes for vegan Caesar out there—raw and cooked—and tons of substitutes for the ingredients that give Caesar salad its taste. With a little nooch, a little seaweed, and some nuts, raw, vegan Caesar is as easy as pie, and I happen to think it’s even tastier. Try this dressing, and tell me if you don’t agree.

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Raw, Vegan Caesar Salad Dressing (makes about 1 1/4 cups)

1/2 c cashews
1/4 c hemp (if you can’t afford or don’t have hemp seeds, all cashews is fine, too)
1/4 c nutritional yeast
1/4 tsp salt
2 lemons juice
black pepper
3 pitted dates
1 tsp kelp granules (optional, but good for recreating the anchovy taste)
3/4 c water
2 large stalks celery

Blend all ingredients together in a high speed blender, or, if you haven’t got one, soak the nuts first and put it all in a regular blender. Serve over romaine lettuce and any other veggies you like.
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