3 years ago
Raw Chocolate-Banana Shake

By Sarma Melngailis, via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Chocolate Banana Shake
Serves 2 to 4
Use either organic cocoa powder or raw carob powder in this shake (or a combination of both.) Carob powder comes from the pods of carob trees that grow in the Mediterranean. Carob does not contain any of the stimulants found in cocoa and it’s high in calcium. We feel carob is hugely underappreciated, but try it in this shake and you might just prefer it to chocolate.

3 cups frozen diced bananas
2 cups Brazil nut or almond milk
¼ cup agave nectar or 2 packets Stevia
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 heaping tablespoons organic cocoa powder or carob powder
Pinch of sea salt

In a blender, puree all ingredients until smooth and creamy.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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Chocolate-Avocado Pudding

By Sarma Melngailis, via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Chocolate-Avocado Pudding
Serves 4
This rich, thick pudding is full of good ingredients and easy to make, especially if you have a jar of sprouted pecan butter on hand. If you don’t, the preparation will include just one extra step. Dark agave nectar gives the pudding a richer flavor, but regular agave is fine. You can also use a combination of maple syrup and agave nectar, or even all maple if you like its rich flavor.
As a child I hated avocados; now I love them. However, if someone had made this pudding for me back then, I would have eagerly spooned it down none the wiser. And as everyone knows by now, avocados are full of good fats. They also have more digestible protein than some meat, and with more potassium than bananas, they’re a great food for athletes, as well as active kids, who can benefit from potassium-rich foods to help heal sore muscles.
1 cup sprouted, preferably dehydrated, pecans
1 cup dark agave nectar (page 44)
1 1/4 cups filtered water
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons cocoa powder
3/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons coconut butter/oil, warmed to liquefy
2 medium avocados
To make the pecan butter, place the pecans in a food processor and process until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed for a uniform texture. A small amount of coconut butter/oil can be added to help grind the nuts into a smooth paste; this will make the pudding a little bit firmer.
Place the pecan butter, agave nectar, water, cocoa powder, and salt in a high-speed blender and blend until smooth. While the blender is running, slowly add the coconut butter/oil. Add the avocado and blend until smooth.
Serve immediately or chill to set.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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Sesame–Mixed Vegetable “Noodles” with Herbs

I find myself amused by the title “Executive Sous Chef”. Sounds like professional kitchens these days need org charts.

By Sarma Melngailis, via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Sesame–Mixed Vegetable “Noodles” with Herbs
Serves 8 to 10
One night, our executive sous chef Anthony made an amuse-bouche out of a little bundle of thinly sliced vegetables tossed in a dressing and tied together with a chive. The flavor reminded me of creamy peanut butter noodles. It’s now a regular in our family meal rotation, and so yummy!
Mellow red miso has a deep, semisweet flavor, but you can use another variety of miso if you prefer. Most sliceable vegetables taste great with this dressing, so it’s really a matter of what looks good at the market or in your garden, what’s in season, or what you happen to have on hand. Substitute or add julienned yellow summer squash, jicama, cucumber, thinly sliced snow peas, or napa cabbage. If you like seaweed, add soaked, rinsed, and drained arame or hijiki. For sweetness add thinly sliced mango, or for richness sliced avocado. Basil or mint chiffonade, or both, are also nice additions.
In fact, you can prepare this with almost anything. If all you have is a pile of zucchini and nothing else, that would be just fine, too. Multiply the dressing recipe to keep on hand as a salad dressing or dipping sauce.


Sesame Dressing
1cup sesame tahini
¼ cup sesame oil
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
¼ cup mellow red miso
3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons filtered water
1/4 cup black sesame seeds

In a large bowl, whisk together the tahini, sesame oil, lemon juice, miso, and 1/2 cup of the water. Add the remaining water a bit at a time and continue whisking until smooth.
Stir in the sesame seeds and set aside.

Vegetables
4 cups daikon radish, julienned on a mandoline
2 red bell peppers, cored and julienned
3 medium zucchini, julienned on a mandoline
3 medium carrots, peeled and julienned on a mandoline
6 baby bok choy, leaves thinly sliced on a bias
3 scallions, whites and about 1 inch of green, thinly sliced
1 big handful cilantro leaves
Sea salt

In a large bowl, toss all the prepared vegetables and the sesame dressing until evenly coated.
Season to taste with sea salt.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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Herb and Argan Salad

Argan oil is expensive but awfully tasty. Worth experimenting with other nut oils to see if you can find one less pricey that still works well.

By Sarma Melngailis via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Herb and Argan Salad
Serves 4 to 6

Before Neal became our chef, he worked on the line. Late one night, I asked him to make me a salad, telling him only that I wanted it to be light, with plenty of herbs. As it turns out, what came out from the kitchen was the most delicious salad I had ever eaten. There was something about the balance of flavors, the lightness of the dressing, and the perfect tart-citrus acidity, with just the right seasoning. Oh, and yes, tons of herbs. Also, either he knew of my love of fennel and capers, or we just share that fondness, but those made it into the salad, too. Capers have a briny saltiness with a bit of a mustard taste, and fennel adds a uniquely aromatic anise flavor. The nuts give the salad some crunch, and the avocado some creaminess, but I tasted another nutty flavor that turned out to be argan oil. Like macadamia oil, this oil is so flavorful that a little goes a long way.

1 large bowl of mixed baby lettuces
1 very large handful parsley leaves
1 small handful mint leaves
1 small handful purple basil leaves
1/2 fennel bulb, cored and shaved thin on a mandoline or using a sharp knife
1 large handful grape or teardrop tomatoes, sliced into halves
3 tablespoons capers
2 tablespoons argan oil, or other nut oil
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1 small handful raw pistachio nuts, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil or nut oil
1/2 ripe avocado, thinly sliced

Place the greens, herbs, fennel, tomatoes, and capers in a bowl and toss with the argan oil and lemon juice, adjusting quantities to taste. Season lightly with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Place the pistachio nuts in a small bowl, add the olive oil and a pinch of salt, and toss well to coat.
Divide the salad among serving plates, sprinkle with the chopped pistachio mixture, and top with sliced avocado.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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Cilantro-Pineapple Shake

I imagine you could throw a couple of handfuls of greens in to turn it into a green (well, greener) smoothie.

By Sarma Melngailis, via Tracy Anderson’s website.

Cilantro-Pineapple Shake
Serves 2
I love cucumbers in shakes because they add filling, thick volume, but they’re very light and low in calories. Mango is also really good in this shake, either as a substitute for, or in addition to, the pineapple.
2 cucumbers, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup coconut water or filtered water
1/2 pineapple, peeled and chopped
2 tablespoons agave nectar, or more to taste
1 large bunch cilantro
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
In a blender, puree all the ingredients until smooth.

(Source: tracyandersonmethod.com)

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3 years ago
Raw Spicy Coconut Noodles

I’m not sure what she means by “ground chili pepper”. In my cooking vocabulary, there are chile peppers, which come in a variety of levels of spiciness and are available both fresh and dried, and there’s chili powder, which is a blend of ground chiles and spices. My best guess for “ground chili pepper” is cayenne. (Here endeth the detail-freak digression for the evening. *grin*)

On a more serious note, you may wish to avoid papaya if you’re concerned about GMOs and contamination.

From a post on Raw Freedom Community.

Spicy Peanut Coconut Noodle
By Sarma Melngailis
Posted on GreenChefs here [RRN note: link seems to be broken/domain has been nabbed by a squatter]

Peanuts are technically a legume, although you wouldn’t necessarily think so considering someone misleadingly named them “peanuts.” Make sure you get really fresh, organically grown peanuts. Some debate persists about peanuts having toxicity, but it seems this may be from peanuts that are too old; at any rate, most toxins and other undesirables are washed away in the soaking process. However, if you don’t feel comfortable eating peanuts, try this with cashews.

“One of our chefs, Amanda, helped us turn this idea into a really great, flavorful dish. The flesh of young Thai coconuts makes perfect noodles — although they are soft, they do not stick together and are as easy or easier to eat then regular starchy noodles.”

Serves 4

For the spiced peanuts:
1 1/2 cups raw peanuts, coarsely chopped and soaked 4 hours or more
1/4 cup raw honey
2 teaspoons ground chili pepper
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Drain and dry the peanuts and toss them in a medium bowl with the honey, chili pepper, and salt until well coated. Spread them in one layer on a Teflex-lined dehydrator tray and dehydrate at 115F for 1 to 2 days, until crunchy.


For the peanut sauce:
1/2 cup coconut meat
1 cup coconut water
2 cups peanuts, soaked 4 hours or more
1/4 cup nama shoyu
1 cup chopped ginger
1/2 cup galangal
3/4 cup raw almond butter
2 small red chili peppers, seeds optional
1/2 to 1 cup filtered water
3 tablespoons maple syrup
1/2 cup lime juice

In a high-speed blender, blend all the sauce ingredients except the lime juice until smooth. If using right away, add the lime juice and blend further to combine. If not, store the sauce in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Before serving, bring to room temperature and thoroughly stir or blend in the lime juice to thin it out again.


For serving:
2 cups coconut noodles, from about 4 coconuts
1 cup julienned jicama
1 cup julienned green papaya (or green mango)
1 cup julienned bok choy
1 cup julienned French radishes
2 green onions, white and 1 inch green, thinly sliced on a bias
1 large handful cilantro
1 small handful Thai basil
1 tablespoon finely minced red chili pepper
Coarse sea salt
2 tablespoons sesame oil
2 tablespoons nama shoyu
2 limes, cut in half

In a large bowl, add the coconut noodles, jicama, green papaya, and the peanut sauce and toss to coat well. Add the bok choy, radishes, green onions, cilantro, half of the basil, half of the red chile, a sprinkle of salt, and gently toss. Divide among 3 serving plates and sprinkle with the spiced peanuts and the remaining basil and chili. Drizzle the sesame oil and nama shoyu on the plate around the noodles and garnish with the lime halves (which should be squeezed over the noodles just before eating).

 

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